Public library Books Toute l'UE1 en fiches PACES - 2ed Chimie g home economics

Sway The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior PDF/EPUB

A fascinating journey into the hidden psychological influences that derail our decision making Sway will change the way you think about the way you thinkWhy is it so difficult to sell a plummeting stock or end a doomed relationship? Why do we listen to advice just because it came from someone “important”? Why are we likely to fall in love when there’s danger involved? In Sway renowned organizational thinker Ori Brafman and his brother psychologist Rom Brafman answer all these questions and Drawing on cutting edge research from the fields of social psychology behavioral economics and organizational behavior Sway reveals dynamic forces that influence every aspect of our personal and business lives including loss aversion our tendency to go to great lengths to avoid perceived losses the diagnosis bias our inability to reevaluate our initial diagnosis of a person or situation and the “chameleon effect” our tendency to take on characteristics that have been arbitrarily assigned to us Sway introduces us to the Harvard Business School professor who got his students to pay 204 for a 20 bill the head of airline safety whose disregard for his years of training led to the transformation of an entire industry and the football coach who turned conventional strategy on its head to lead his team to victory We also learn the curse of the NBA draft discover why interviews are a terrible way to gauge future job performance and go inside a session with the Supreme Court to see how the world’s most powerful justices avoid the dangers of group dynamicsEvery once in a while a book comes along that not only challenges our views of the world but changes the way we think In Sway Ori and Rom Brafman not only uncover rational explanations for a wide variety of irrational behaviors but also point readers toward ways to avoid succumbing to their pull


10 thoughts on “Sway The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior

  1. gR}HwvH)Z*B6%I]Vjo oui{}4F*mX] GE HqŒESED)lҶy84)tjuMle]4F/Eٌ 8e1&t`%OzFc)rً-dc )rIL5LF0LjD,$\lrX6eD D H@ G)$%5YG#_Ol'Lj&hL>) P%LT؛xm5MS1E-&Gvb{64q/ eF@! @0 1"3h   qb0Ue0qONdĝz&\  )7WͶ˨IuK=HG[@Y+l#jy.3=z>"m+H虯[jRg}YtRfegs}m @A@LPDTD `dP lT|=/>yj[+HЫEV]7_ijx0VfwɠG'V:*/2-?f^IBJӴ.y0_-&7ZK'jwu=ʨHIkQw8!D+b҃;s a:7EqpԉnE!t1KÕҲ0Eg6gPw3Iv w;\qPء,;@ DE@FGā?!8":NM}-QpYLoX)\U^<]c)0kp04p ] JJ`aimۺ=,OW&ecь(X=C\oIlPrL;3ͤI0e} !ydCʸZ2/4k͐.fxDye)}h! Ĺ̸6zM}abb (#ܮTECl Q'HL}Ĭ}}V#Le# g5|-%'y. 3!,Y$wf*:вVdo`wSVJG|y`zAb8|ojSЖ4) &8ȗ7N YrfWʖdZWE|-vr.s,Z=bd鄏u\%j툭ʜ eT9u")桰k>kP b] 1LѦ娮 Q2܀~qeep-L61X8m4k׬(:*v~o?Kr!Fpp7̹D[pu- kQ $HWL",ێϸД&0V$~Sx7qs["ƵPMn(M:CGBfGOTUeH8 jxO ,19,iSac$s:YGy8TK}!BR-A;:@z)[9vU dvH!0=#1'ktmvB{CTps_iB`[й}b.謜yxJΣ$Psj+E)iH*ZQcd>MSf^GȦf+x>0==U @Um &)JA=%g8Ai[^?B\SCˇ"];#M2kζCX ̹9YA46\k @rĹ1W Uil^`SDFPWW| o8,iSl*c@Wq M  z/qp4jK{q RǷCB BAt˔ႠQ 0UҚ:}U-Ŵ3B!D0aGrڿDVnnUjC8R^KBW¯is@tu䂷0. KhZlB5㑞W!C*깩H ؛.[,"˾dYxb8)͌x*,*g~# c]fy-Tq:HCLfU?5Dz5HFef `0+f;l.lz:7*%'`2*Ǯ;:Bt9xD?1y(e ae@:E+%c&xqjaD!ݱ)֚5Vœ*_x]Hp H%@V/DT.$T e̓5mU&ͥ^yzTdzRX*--\pJ2]!~~ݹA>摒Zixyr!2 BWf4Fjy }9K1lA5!#c:PMu9!|D,i^*ߑTȔf2[*@2m R2*l =zEE% ]85KG:Ŵ(`U`Ôe`Bj֨"Þ.ўUUm,Z-iH1,ݭ~^k,N3Q ^һՇ9>򍣚W!qٶd#G@b a?, ,QP \\,nyO2my,52A}7+վ**S\c5W5nLY膬3#wp=bTt ¡G8PTP^8P-ᮬvVؕ[l&s`25Bӎ_,+&Jb].[ #ӎ}@@BLLP\|T,} #Y&|KBsHdP D@@@@ HPTlpD<\\|}0p2~,xּY^PBOeӥ/.̚tUr " srcset=">d`l$$( ( ,,$,(,,,8@0(,4L\T@PgR}HwvH)Z*B6%I]Vjo oui{}4F*mX] GE HqŒESED)lҶy84)tjuMle]4F/Eٌ 8e1&t`%OzFc)rً-dc )rIL5LF0LjD,$\lrX6eD D H@ G)$%5YG#_Ol'Lj&hL>) P%LT؛xm5MS1E-&Gvb{64q/ eF@! @0 1"3h   qb0Ue0qONdĝz&\  )7WͶ˨IuK=HG[@Y+l#jy.3=z>"m+H虯[jRg}YtRfegs}m @A@LPDTD `dP lT|=/>yj[+HЫEV]7_ijx0VfwɠG'V:*/2-?f^IBJӴ.y0_-&7ZK'jwu=ʨHIkQw8!D+b҃;s a:7EqpԉnE!t1KÕҲ0Eg6gPw3Iv w;\qPء,;@ DE@FGā?!8":NM}-QpYLoX)\U^<]c)0kp04p ] JJ`aimۺ=,OW&ecь(X=C\oIlPrL;3ͤI0e} !ydCʸZ2/4k͐.fxDye)}h! Ĺ̸6zM}abb (#ܮTECl Q'HL}Ĭ}}V#Le# g5|-%'y. 3!,Y$wf*:вVdo`wSVJG|y`zAb8|ojSЖ4) &8ȗ7N YrfWʖdZWE|-vr.s,Z=bd鄏u\%j툭ʜ eT9u")桰k>kP b] 1LѦ娮 Q2܀~qeep-L61X8m4k׬(:*v~o?Kr!Fpp7̹D[pu- kQ $HWL",ێϸД&0V$~Sx7qs["ƵPMn(M:CGBfGOTUeH8 jxO ,19,iSac$s:YGy8TK}!BR-A;:@z)[9vU dvH!0=#1'ktmvB{CTps_iB`[й}b.謜yxJΣ$Psj+E)iH*ZQcd>MSf^GȦf+x>0==U @Um &)JA=%g8Ai[^?B\SCˇ"];#M2kζCX ̹9YA46\k @rĹ1W Uil^`SDFPWW| o8,iSl*c@Wq M  z/qp4jK{q RǷCB BAt˔ႠQ 0UҚ:}U-Ŵ3B!D0aGrڿDVnnUjC8R^KBW¯is@tu䂷0. KhZlB5㑞W!C*깩H ؛.[,"˾dYxb8)͌x*,*g~# c]fy-Tq:HCLfU?5Dz5HFef `0+f;l.lz:7*%'`2*Ǯ;:Bt9xD?1y(e ae@:E+%c&xqjaD!ݱ)֚5Vœ*_x]Hp H%@V/DT.$T e̓5mU&ͥ^yzTdzRX*--\pJ2]!~~ݹA>摒Zixyr!2 BWf4Fjy }9K1lA5!#c:PMu9!|D,i^*ߑTȔf2[*@2m R2*l =zEE% ]85KG:Ŵ(`U`Ôe`Bj֨"Þ.ўUUm,Z-iH1,ݭ~^k,N3Q ^һՇ9>򍣚W!qٶd#G@b a?, ,QP \\,nyO2my,52A}7+վ**S\c5W5nLY膬3#wp=bTt ¡G8PTP^8P-ᮬvVؕ[l&s`25Bӎ_,+&Jb].[ #ӎ}@@BLLP\|T,} #Y&|KBsHdP D@@@@ HPTlpD<\\|}0p2~,xּY^PBOeӥ/.̚tUr " class="avatar avatar-100 photo amp-wp-enforced-sizes" height="100" width="100" layout="intrinsic"> says:

    First you need to find yourself an interesting verb – Sway in this case obviously but Snoop is also good as is Stick It doesn’t have to start with ‘s’ – there’s Blink as well of course Then you need some really good stories about people at the end of their tether Plane accidents are particularly good for this Both Outliers and Sway both have plane crashes and both have you at the edge of your seat waiting for the inevitableThen you need ‘get out of here’ psychology tests – honestly who comes up with the ideas for these things and why WHY are they still allowed to out on the streets? Clearly these people are a danger to themselves their families and the rest of the community I mean who would think to test how much attractive you find a woman after crossing a rickety bridge? What sort of sociopath would you need to be for that to present itself as something that you might like to test?If you do want to write one of these books it also seems to help if you are from Israel I’m not going to pretend I understand this final connection – but that has been true of both this one and Predictably Irrational Oh and you might want to write the book with your brother Not sure how this works either but it does seem to Made to Stick was also written by a pair of brothersI have read so many of these books lately and I’m currently also struggling my way through another called Nudge again written by two people but this time not brothers or even related – although both male Even if I feel I’m overdosing on this stuff this one was a particularly fine example of the genreThis was good not so much because all of the examples were new but because they put an interesting twist on the interpretation of what these odd behaviours might ‘mean’I’m not going to go into the explanation of why the chief pilot in charge of safety for an airline might end up causing the worst plane crash of all time – although this would be as good a reason to read this book as any other I can think of nor any of the other seemingly endless examples of human irrational behaviour But I do mean to talk about who wants to be a millionaire because this has really made me thinkI really love the French I know people don’t like them for some reason or other generally involving some talk of arrogance but I love their sense of humour and I love their sense of style That whole stuff the rest of you we’re French thing or the if we want to blast the b’Jesus out of some atoll in the South Pacific well it is our atoll And if you want to stop drinking our wine to protest – what can we say but you will only be punishing yourselves I would love to have that level of self confidenceI was talking to someone the other week about the whole ‘Freedom Fries’ thing – but I had forgotten some of the details of this story This is retold here in full and is probably worth the price of the book for that alone I had missed the French reply to the proposal to change the name of French Fries to Freedom Fries simply because the French had the audacity to say that it might be dumb to invade Iraq I hadn’t realised they had responded by saying something to the effect of “This is much important than potatoes” Given that most rational people in the world would now agree with France probably means we should change the name again to Fickle FriesBut I distract myself The best bit of this book is the description of the French version of who wants to be a millionaire when the contestant turned to ask the audience the answer to what ought to have been a simple question of astronomy – what revolves around the earth and the audience effectively said ‘stuff you’ The Wisdom of Crowds points out that if you ever end up on this show and find yourself in difficulty you should rely on the answer given by the audience as in the US the audience gets the right answer over 90% of the time But in France or Russia this is not quite so simple a choice In France if the audience thinks you are too thick to deserve to win they are just as likely on mass to give you the wrong answer In Russia if they think you are stepping too far out of line they are also as likely to give you the wrong answer Imagine that Imagine that there are cultures that will decide whether to help you or not based on whether they think you deserve to win or not This discussion really fascinated meI really liked that this one started each chapter with a whole series of what were virtually headlines and it was only as you got into the chapter that you began to understand that “We don’t even know where the tunnel is” might refer to LBJBut the bit of this book that will stay with me for months is the random attribution of ‘gradings’ to soldiers and how this got the soldiers to live up to how they were graded If you ever needed some proof about why you should encourage your kids – this is itThis is a wonderfully well written book and one that really could not fail to amuse Yet another of the long line of books on the troublesome boarder between economics and psychology that have been providing me with so much joy lately