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Blink The Power of Thinking Without Thinking MOBI ä

Drawing on cutting edge neuroscience and psychology and displaying all of the brilliance that made The Tipping Point a classic Blink changes the way you'll understand every decision you make Never again will you think about thinking the same wayMalcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us Now in Blink he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within Blink is a book about how we think without thinking about choices that seem to be made in an instant in the blink of an eye that actually aren't as simple as they seem Why are some people brilliant decision makers while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win while others end up stumbling into error? How do our brains really work in the office in the classroom in the kitchen and in the bedroom? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? In Blink we meet the psychologist who has learned to predict whether a marriage will last based on a few minutes of observing a couple the tennis coach who knows when a player will double fault before the racket even makes contact with the ball the antiquities experts who recognize a fake at a glance Here too are great failures of blink the election of Warren Harding New Coke and the shooting of Amadou Diallo by police Blink reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating but those who have perfected the art of thin slicing filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables


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    Here's Blink in a nutshellSplit decisions can be good better than decisions where we take a lot of time to carefully weigh our options and use scientific evidence Except when they're notRapid cognition is an exciting and powerful way to use your brain's quick intuitive capabilities to make stunningly accurate decisions and can even lead you to have better success in sports business and politics Except when it won'tWe should learn to trust our snap judgments even in seemingly complex situations where we don't have a lot of informationExcept not reallyBasically the book gives scientific and anecdotal evidence on why rapid cognition can be both a good and bad thing without offering us much advise on how to tell the difference between situations where we should or shouldn't trust our instincts There are many times when I felt that Gladwell contradicted himself To support his rapid cognition is good section of the book he uses an example of a psychological test where students were able to tell whether or not a professor was good at their job by simply watching a 5 second clip of them lecturing with the sound turned off The results basically corresponded with impressions given by other students who spent an entire class with those professors thus proving that there is some mysterious and powerful part of our subconscious that can make accurate snap judgmentsBut then later on in the book in the rapid cognition is bad section Gladwell warns us that in general people instantly like tall attractive white people better than short unattractive minoritiesWELL DUH OBVIOUSLY THE STUDENTS RATING THE PROFESSORS WERE BIASED BY WHETHER OR NOT THEY WERE TALL WHITE OR ATTRACTIVE Mystery solvedWhile Gladwell brings up some interesting concepts his book never gels into a coherent whole I read most of it in under a day and already my rapid cognition is telling me it's not worth finishing